Classes de Computadora
Mar
27
5:00 pm17:00

Classes de Computadora

Technology classes are offered in Spanish on Monday evenings between 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.  Topics include basic computer skills, navigating the internet, e-mail, e-readers, and Microsoft Word.  These one-on-one classes are by appointment only.  Please register by calling (860) 889-2365, ext. 108 or 109.  

Las clases tendrán lugar los lunes de 5-8. Cada clase durará una hora. Para reservar una hora con el instructor, apersonese a la biblioteca o llame al Escritorio de Información y mencinone qué le gustaría aprender 860-889-2365 ext. 108 o 109.

 

Dr. Kevin Dann Celebrates Henry David Thoreau
Mar
27
6:00 pm18:00

Dr. Kevin Dann Celebrates Henry David Thoreau

Otis Library will host historian and naturalist Dr. Kevin Dann on Monday, March 27, at 6pm in the Millie and Martin Shapiro Community Room.

In honor of the 200th anniversary of Henry David Thoreau’s birth, Dr. Kevin Dann is walking from New York City to Concord, Massachusetts. Performing Captain of a Huckleberry Party – his provocative celebration of Thoreau in riddle, rhyme, and story – in 13 towns along the way, he hopes to inspire a new generation of Americans to take up Thoreau’s practice of enlivened observation of nature and enlightened citizenship.

Dr. Kevin Dann is the author of 10 books, including Bright Colors Falsely Seen: Synaesthesia and the Search for Transcendental KnowledgeAcross the Great Border Fault: The Naturalist Myth in America; and Lewis Creek Lost and Found.  His latest book, Expect Great Things: The Life and Search of Henry David Thoreau, will be available for sale and signing.  Dr. Dann has taught at Rutgers University, University of Vermont, and SUNY. He wrote, produced, and acted in Brooklyn’s first immersive street mystery, Enigma.

This program is free and open to the public.  No registration required.  

 

Drop-In Chess
Mar
29
5:00 pm17:00

Drop-In Chess

Wednesdays, 5pm - 8pm in the Business Center 

Players of all ages and skill levels are invited to play chess.  Use one of our chess sets or bring your own.  

Technology Classes
Mar
29
5:00 pm17:00

Technology Classes

Feeling a little lost with all the new technology?  Maybe even some of the old technology?  We are ready to assist you with one-on-one instruction tailored to your specific needs. Topics include basic computer skills, navigating the internet, e-mail, e-readers, and Microsoft Office.  Assistance will be provided by appointment only on Wednesdays, 5:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.  Please call 860-889-2365, ext. 100, for additional information or to make an appointment.

Prudence Crandall And The Harris Sisters
Apr
1
1:30 pm13:30

Prudence Crandall And The Harris Sisters

Prudence Crandall was a schoolteacher who fought in the early nineteenth century to integrate her school in Canterbury, CT, and educate black women.  When Crandall accepted a black women as a student, she unleashed a storm of controversy that catapulted her to national notoriety and drew the attention of the most prominent pro- and antislavery activists of the day.  

Prudence Crandall is justifiably celebrated in Connecticut as the the State Heroine. Less recognized are the black students, including the Harris Sisters of Norwich, who assumed enormous risk to receive an elite education. Indeed, the stimulus to the establishment of the academy was the repeated requests of Sarah Harris, a housekeeper to Prudence, to take classes at the then all-white school. The resulting withdrawal of the white students from the academy and subsequent establishment of an all-black girls' school constitute a remarkable chapter in the annals of abolitionist history. And Norwich natives were key in this brave, transformative effort.  

On April 1, former state senator Donald Williams, author of "Prudence Crandall's Legacy: The Fight for Equality in the 1830s, Dred Scott, and Brown v. Board of Education," will present a lecture on the academy that includes the contributions and lives of the Harris Sisters.

Free event; no registraiton is required.

They Called Her Reckless
Apr
5
6:30 pm18:30

They Called Her Reckless

Author Janet Barrett will discuss her book "They Called Her Reckless: A True Story of War, Love And One Extraordinary Horse" in the Meeting Room.

When the Fifth Regiment's Recoilless Rifle Platoon acquired a small Korean pony to haul ammunition to the front lines, what they got was a real-life warhorse, the courageous and indomitable Reckless, who stood with her Marines for two years during the Korean War, saving many lives, raising spirits, and winning the love and respect of all who knew her.  

From the moment she heard about Reckless, Janet Barrett knew she would write "They Called Her Reckless."  Her experiences as a horsewoman gave her a particular appreaciation of the tight bond that developed between Reckless and her fellow Marines, from which the story springs.  Barrett has loved, and been fascinated by horses all her life, and for 25 years almost obsessively rode, owned, and cared for them.  She is the author of "On The Fence: A Parent's Handbook of Horseback Riding."

This program is free and open to the public.  No registration is required.  Copies of "They Called Her Reckless" will be available for sale and signing.

Prudence
Apr
8
12:00 pm12:00

Prudence

The Emerson Theater Collaborative (ETC) and Otis Library announce a staged reading of Stefan Lanfer’s new play, Prudence on Saturday, April 8, 2017 from 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. in the Community Room. The play is directed by Theresa Broach, produced by Lisa Giordano and sponsored by Otis Library and The Elsie Brown Fund. The cast includes: Jennifer Briere, Theresa Broach, Barbara Fontanella, Ciara Rollins and James Kenney.

The play is set in 1833, when to further their education, two-dozen African American girls arrive in a small New England town from across the free states. In the town, they were insulted, assaulted, and risked fines as well as public whippings if they refused to leave the school. Their teacher, Prudence Crandall, a white Quaker woman, was jailed, and the ensuing trials nearly forced the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on whether nonwhites were citizens. Weaving together past and present, Prudence traces these events through the eyes of present day African American young women who visit today’s Prudence Crandall Museum, as they, like their 19th century counterparts, grapple with how to claim America’s promise.

The play reading is being held in conjunction with the anniversary on April 16th of the birth of Prudence Crandall’s first student - Sarah Harris who was born and raised in Norwich, and in honor of the anniversary of the official opening of Prudence Crandall’s Academy on April 1, 1833.

This event is free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. For more information call (860) 861-3743 or go to www.emersontheatercollaborative.org. Sign language interpretation will be available for the event. Advance registration is required. Please contact Julie Menders at Otis Library at least two weeks before the program date at (860) 889-2365, ext. 128 or jmenders@otislibrarynorwich.org.

Changing Minds Book Club
Apr
12
5:00 pm17:00

Changing Minds Book Club

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon

Join us in the Meeting Room for conversation and refreshments.  Free; no registration necessary.  Copies of the book are available to borrow at the Front Desk.  For more information, call Julie at (860) 889-2365, ext. 128.

 

 


 

Delicious Discussion Author Series:  Harry Haskell
Apr
20
12:00 pm12:00

Delicious Discussion Author Series: Harry Haskell

Our next Delicious Discussion Author Luncheon will be held on Thursday, April 20, and will feature Harry Haskell, author of Maiden Flight. Please join us at Michael Jordan's Steak House at Mohegan Sun from 12 - 1:30pm for this fantastic event and celebrate Women's History Month! 

The Delicious Discussion Author Series is an ongoing partnership with Bank Square Books and Michael Jordan's Steak House. The luncheon is generously sponsored by Guinan & Houle, LLP, Attorneys at Law.

"Masterfully drawing on intimate family letters, Haskell crosses the boundaries of fact and fiction to bring to life the distinctive voices of an era and illuminate one exceptional woman's struggle for independence and fulfillment." - Lauren Belfer, author of And After the Fire

Maiden Flight is the true-life story of the Wright sister who in 1926 left her world-famous and intensely possessive older brother to marry newspaper editor Harry Haskell, the man she loved, and suffered the unhappy consequences. An international celebrity in her own right, Katharine embodied the worldly, independent, and self-fulfilled New Woman of the early twentieth century. Yet she remained in many ways a Victorian. Torn between duty and love, she agonized for months before making her devastating break with Orville at age fifty-two.


Tickets are $40 and include lunch, dessert, a paperback copy of Maiden Flight and author signing. Reservations are required. To purchase tickets, contact Kate McDonald, Development Manager at (860) 889-2365 or kmcdonald@otislibrarynorwich.org or visit: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/delicious-discussions-with-harry-haskell-maiden-flight-tickets-31972871720

Harry Haskell is the grandson of Henry J. (Harry) Haskell, husband of Katharine Wright. He is the author of Boss-Busters and Sin Hounds: Kansas City and Its Star, The Early Music Revival: A History, and editor of The Attentive Listener: Three Centuries of Music Criticism. He lives in Guilford, Connecticut.


Writers Workshop
Mar
25
10:30 am10:30

Writers Workshop

Writers Workshop - 2nd and 4th Saturdays of January, February and March at 10:30am in the Meeting Room.  Facilitated by Writing Instructor Mary Lu Higgins.  Registration is required; call (860) 889-2365, ext. 128.

The bi-weekly monthly meetings in a small, personal environment will motivate and support the writer.  Each workshop will provide a short lecture, a creative exercise, discussion and positive feedback.  Both new and experienced writers are welcome.  

This program is sponsored by the R. S. Gernon Trust and The Friends of Otis Library.

Chess Tournament
Mar
25
10:00 am10:00

Chess Tournament

Otis Library will host the Norwich Chess Open on Saturday, March 25, in the Millie and Martin Shapiro Community Room. The entry fee for this United States Chess Federation (USFC) tournament is $30, on-site only.  The structure of the tournament is 3-SS, G/30 d5.  Registration is 10am – 10:20am.  Round 1 begins at 10:40am, Rounds 2 and 3 as soon as possible.  First prize is $240, second prize is $120; based on 12 entries.  Open to all ages and ratings. The Free Non-Rated Beginners Section is open to players who have never been a USCF member. Register 11 am - 11:15 am.  3-SS, G/15 d5.  Top three win prizes.

For further information, contact Rob Roy at 860-742-5562 or connecticutchess@gmail.com . This event is sponsored by The Friends of Otis Library.

Drop-In Knitting Group
Mar
24
10:00 am10:00

Drop-In Knitting Group

The Rows City Knitters meet every Friday at 10:00 a.m. in the Meeting Room.  All skill levels welcome!  For more information, call (860) 889-2365, ext. 128. 

Meeting Room

Women's History Month Tea
Mar
18
12:00 pm12:00

Women's History Month Tea

Otis Library, in partnership with the Norwich Free Academy History Department, is hosting a Women's History Month Tea to celebrate this year's theme of "Women in Science."  Join Norwich Free Academy students as they portray ground-breaking women in history.  Tea and desserts will be served.  Free event; registration is required.  Call (860) 889-2365, ext. 128, or register on our online calendar.

Community Room

Book Talk and Signing Event with Malik Champlain
Feb
13
6:00 pm18:00

Book Talk and Signing Event with Malik Champlain

Inspirational Speaker Malik Champlain will talk about his new book Passion Hunger Drive: Live Your Dreams, Not Your Fears in the Community Room. Copies of the book will be available for sale and signing. Free program; no registration required.

Passion Hunger Drive portrays the journey of a young man born in Brooklyn, New York to a teenage mother. He later moved to Connecticut to avoid violence their current neighborhood attracted. As a child Malik was diagnosed with a hearing disorder and struggled to overcome his stuttering problem, being bullied, and labeled a special education student. At a young age Malik uncovered a devastating family secret that would forever change his life. The reader will discover the transformation that leads the author to earning two degrees, becoming a college basketball player, award-winning speaker, and more. In this book, Malik uses the early struggles in his life to deliver a strong message about living for what matters most, overcoming your setbacks, and most of all "Living Your Dreams, Not Your Fears." 

SECT Libraries Celebrate Wally Lamb at the Garde Arts Center - CANCELED
Feb
12
3:00 pm15:00

SECT Libraries Celebrate Wally Lamb at the Garde Arts Center - CANCELED

Due to the inclement weather, the program "SECT Libraries Celebrate Wally Lamb" at the Garde Arts Center has been canceled. It will rescheduled at a future date.

The final program of "SECT Libraries Celebrate Wally Lamb" will take place at the Oasis Room at the Garde Arts Center on Sunday, February 12, at 3pm. Tickets are free, but attendees are asked to register by calling the Garde box office at 860-444-7373, ext. 1, or emailing info@gardearts.org.

Local readers are invited to this special celebration honoring eastern Connecticut's award- winning author.  Mr. Lamb will speak about his novels, answer questions from the audience and sign books.

For the past few months, area libraries have sponsored book discussions of Lamb's novels. His most recent book, I'll Take You There, centers on Felix, the fifth-grader originally featured in Wishin' and Hopin', who is now a film scholar running a Monday night movie club in the Garde.

Libraries in 11 area communities are participating: Groton Public Library, Stonington Free Library, East Lyme Public Library, Wheeler Library, Mystic & Noank Library, Waterford Public Library, Otis Library, Sprague Public Library, Janet Carlson Calvert Library, Public Library of New London and the Ledyard Libraries.

This event was made possible by a collaboration between the Garde and the libraries of SECT.  Please join us as we honor distinguished Connecticut author Wally Lamb.

Perfecting Humanity:  The Norwich State Hospital and the Science of Racial Purity
Jan
30
6:00 pm18:00

Perfecting Humanity: The Norwich State Hospital and the Science of Racial Purity

Eugenics, the attempt to improve the human species socially through better breeding, was a widespread and popular movement in the Unites States and Europe between 1910 and 1940. This program provides an overview of the Norwich State Hospital and Connecticut's involvement in the Eugenics movement at the turn of the 20th century.  Presented by Robert Farwell, Executive Director of Otis Library.

Free and open to the public.

Painting with Faith (all ages)
Jan
28
2:00 pm14:00

Painting with Faith (all ages)

Local artist Faith Satterfield will be on hand to help you create an original work of art relating to "What Does It Mean To Be Human?"  Faith is a mural artist, an internationally trained illustrator and teaching artist.  Drop-in; no registration required

Ginga Brasileira!
Jan
28
10:30 am10:30

Ginga Brasileira!

This program is sponsored by Attorney Bart Sayet and Ms. Lori Lindfors.

In celebration of the opening of the Smithsonian's traveling exhibition, Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, on display at Otis Library from January 7 - February 3, the Brazilian dance troupe Ginga Brasileira will be at the library to perform colorful, crowd-pleasing Afro-Brazilian dances that fuse rhythmic music with high-energy gymnastics and martial arts.  For all ages.

Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human? was organized by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with the American Library Association Public Program Office.  This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.

A Conversation on Modern Sexuality
Jan
25
6:00 pm18:00

A Conversation on Modern Sexuality

Otis Library and OutCT are hosting a panel discussion on the evolution of our understanding of Human Sexuality.  Kia Baird, Festival Chair of OutCT, will moderate discussions from Professors at the University of Connecticut, Mitchell College, and Pacific School of Religion.. OutCT builds community through educational, cultural and social programming that promotes acceptance, tolerance and understanding of all sexual orientations and gender identities. Free event; no registration required.

There will be three short talks followed by a Q&A with the audience:  "Media Impacts on Sexual Attitudes and Behavior" by Tara Broccoli, Associate Professor of Behavioral Sciences at Mitchell College;  "Queer Fiction 1890-1960 and Some Social Issues They Engendered" by Maragret Sonser Breen, Professor of English and Women's, Gender and Sexuality Studies at the University of Connecticut; and "Gender, Sexuality and the Bible" by Daniel Rodriguez Schlorff, Christian Education and Youth Minister at Niantic Community Church and at dissertation stage of Doctor of Ministry in Sexuality and Religion, Pacific School of Religion (Berkeley, CA).

Delicious Discussions Author Series - Beatriz Williams
Jan
25
12:00 pm12:00

Delicious Discussions Author Series - Beatriz Williams

Our next Delicious Discussions event will feature Beatriz Williams, author of The Wicked City.  The event is part of an ongoing partnership with Bank Square Books and Michael Jordan's Steak House and is generously sponsored by Guinan & Houle, LLP, Attorneys at Law.  

Beatriz Williams is the author of the new book The Wicked City and previous books including Overseas (2012), A Hundred Summers (2013), The Secret Life of Violet Grant (2014), Tiny Little Thing (2015), Along the Infinite Sea (2015), The Forgotten Room (2016), and A Certain Age (2016).  A graduate of Stanford University with an MBA from Columbia, Beatriz spent several years in New York and London hiding her early attempts at fiction, first on company laptops as a corporate and communications strategy consultant, and then as an at-home producer of small persons.  She new lives with her husband and four children near the Connecticut shore, where she divides her time between writing and laundry.

Reservations are required. The cost of the event is $45 per person and includes lunch, dessert, a copy of The Wicked City and book signing. To register, please contact Kate McDonald, Development Manager, at kmcdonald@otislibrarynorwi ch.org or (860) 889-2365 x.127.

Paleo Artrist John Gurche
Jan
21
1:00 pm13:00

Paleo Artrist John Gurche

Paleo artist John Gurche will present the program Who Was Homo Naledi?  The Scientific Detective Work Behind Answering This Question.  He will discuss the discovery, excavation, analysis and reconstruction of Homo naledi, a new species of human found in a cave in South Africa.  He will also offer a sneak preview of work for his next book and exhibition. This program is fee and open to the public.

John Gurche's work can be seen in the Smithsonian Institution, the American Museum of Natural History, Chicago's Field Museum and other museums around the world.  His illustrations have been featured in National Geographic Magazine, including four covers. His art has appeared on U.S. postage stamps, and he was hired by Stephen Spielberg to create pre-production drawings for Jurassic Park.  Mr. Gurche is the author of Shaping Humanity: How Science, Art and Imagination Help Us Understand our Origins, which is about the thinking and stories behind his creations of fifteen sculptures for the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History Hall of Human Origins, which opened in 2010. 

This program is made possible by a grant from The Institute of Museum and Library Services.  The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation’s 123,000 libraries and 17,500 museums.  The Institute’s mission is to create strong libraries and museums that connect people to information and ideas.  

 

 

Book Discussion - "I'll Take You There"
Jan
18
6:30 pm18:30

Book Discussion - "I'll Take You There"

Discuss the latest novel by Wally Lamb, I'll Take You There.

The book features a grown-up Felix Funicello, protagonist from Wishin' and Hopin',  and the trio of unforgettable women who have played a part in his life.  I’ll Take You There centers on Felix, now a film scholar who runs a Monday night movie club at the Garde Arts Center.

The libraries of southeastern Connecticut are honoring our region’s leading author, Wally Lamb. The celebration was kicked off at the Garde Arts Center in New London on November 20 and will continue around the region with several events through February.
 
On Sunday, February 12, at 3pm, the Garde will host all of Wally Lamb’s local fans for a final celebration.  Mr. Lamb will speak about his novels, meet his readers and sign books at this free event.

 

What Does Human Evolution Mean To You?  A Community Conversation
Jan
11
6:00 pm18:00

What Does Human Evolution Mean To You? A Community Conversation

How do scientific discoveries about human origins relate to people’s personal understanding of the world and their place in it?  Join Drs. Connie Bertka and Jim Miller, co-chairs of the Smithsonian Institution’s Broader Social Impacts Committee, as they encourage a community conversation about human evolution that helps us to understand each other’s perspectives, to identify areas of common interest or concern, and to explore the variety of ways human evolution connects to personal meaning. They will be joined by Drs. Rick Potts and Briana Pobiner from the Smithsonian’s Human Origins Program.

Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human was organized by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with with American Library Association Public Program Office.  This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.

Evening Science Talk
Jan
9
6:00 pm18:00

Evening Science Talk

How can scientific discoveries on human evolution connect with larger understandings of what it means to be human?  Join Dr. Rick Potts, paleoanthropologist and curator of the traveling exhibit Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, and Dr. Nicholas Bellantoni, former Connecticut State Archaeologist, as they explore the main themes and messages of the traveling exhibit in a program for the general public. The talk and following conversation will explore how fossils, archeological remains, and genetic studies shed light on our connection with the natural world and the origins of sharing, caring, and innovation.  Free and open to the public.

Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human was organized by the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History in collaboration with with American Library Association Public Program Office.  This project was made possible through the support of a grant from the John Templeton Foundation and support from the Peter Buck Human Origins Fund.

Battlefields of the Pequot War
Jan
8
2:00 pm14:00

Battlefields of the Pequot War

Dr. Kevin McBride, Director of Research at the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center, will give a presentation on the battlefields of the Pequot War.  After more than 375 years, the Pequot War remains one of the most controversial and significant events in Colonial and Native history of America.  The Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center is identifying and preserving battlefields and historical sites associated with the Pequot War.  The museum's new exhibit, "Archaeology of Mistick Fort," highlights the latest findings, with over 60 artifacts from the Pequot Museum's archaeological surveys of the Mistick Fort site and subsequent English Allied Withdrawal.  

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings
Dec
31
12:00 pm12:00

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings

Lincoln Center Local partners with Otis Library to bring film screenings of world-class performances to your neighborhood.  Join us in the Community Room for a free screening of New York Philharmonic New Year's Eve: La Vie Parisienne.  No registration required; refreshments will be served.

A New Year's Eve tradition continues when the New York Philharmonic welcomes opera star Susan Graham and the inimitable Nathan Lane for a sampling of fizzy French treats ranging from the Can Can to Carnival of the Animals.

Community Room

 

Friday Film Series
Dec
23
1:00 pm13:00

Friday Film Series

Otis Library will screen four films in December that highlight the question "What Does It Mean To Be Human?"  This film series is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, which will visit Otis Library in January 2017.  Guest lecturer Jason M. Sheldon will provide commentary before and after each film.

Otis Library will be screening the acclaimed film Human, directed by Yann Arthus-Bertrand, on December 23. The film, which is made up of 200 deeply personal portraits, and interviews with people from all walks of life.  Human collects real-life emotional stories from over 2000 men and women in more than 60 countries around the world, combining intimate close-ups with breathtaking aerial-photography to ultimately explore the interconnectivity of humans across the Globe, and the meaning of what it means to be human. The film received a special screening at the 72nd Venice International Film Festival.  This film is suitable for ages 16 and up.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

Friday Film Series
Dec
16
1:00 pm13:00

Friday Film Series

Otis Library will screen four films in December that highlight the question "What Does It Mean To Be Human?"  This film series is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, which will visit Otis Library in January 2017.  Guest lecturer Jason M. Sheldon will provide commentary before and after each film.

On December 16 we will screen Children of Men, a 2006 British-American science fiction thriller directred and co-written by Alfonso Cuarón, based on P. D. James 1992 novel of the same name.  When infertility threatens mankind with extinction and the last child born has perished, a disillusioned bureaucrat (Clive Owen) becomes the unlikely champion in the fight for the survival of Earth's population; He must face down his own demons and protect the planet's last remaining hope from danger.  Rated R.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

Lunch & Learn with Artist Faith Satterfield
Dec
15
12:00 pm12:00

Lunch & Learn with Artist Faith Satterfield

Sponsored by The Edward & Mary Lord Foundation

Enjoy a relaxing afternoon creating a winter-themed painting to take home!  Instruction provided by local artist Faith Satterfield of Murals by Faith.  Lunch is provided.  Reservations are required.  Call (860) 889-2365, ext. 128, or register online.

 

Friday Film Series
Dec
9
1:00 pm13:00

Friday Film Series

Otis Library will screen four films in December that highlight the question "What Does It Mean To Be Human?"  This film series is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, which will visit Otis Library in January 2017.  Guest lecturer Jason M. Sheldon will provide commentary before and after each film.

On December 9th we will screen Cave of Forgotten Dreams from the incomparable Werner Herzog (Encounters at the End of the WorldGrizzly Man) as he follows an exclusive expedition into the nearly inaccessible Chauvet Cave in France, home to the most ancient visual art known to have been created by man.  Cave of Forgotten Dreams is an unforgettable cinematic experience that provides a unique glimpse of pristine artwork dating back to human hands over 30,000 years ago - almost twice as old as any previous discovery.  Rated G.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

"Where We Call Home" Lecture Series:  Stephen Fan
Dec
5
6:30 pm18:30

"Where We Call Home" Lecture Series: Stephen Fan

Otis Library hosts a four-part lecture series entitled “Where We Call Home” in the Millie and Martin Shapiro Community Room.  The series will discuss the changing definition of home and family in America.  It is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit, “Exploring Human Origins: What Does it Mean to be Human,” which will visit Otis Library in January 2017. 

On Monday, December 5, Stephen Fan, editor of the book “Sub-Urbanisms: Casino Urbanization, Chinatowns, and the Contested American Landscape,” will discuss the changing face of Southeastern CT with the arrival of Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun casinos.  The presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m., and will be followed by a question and answer session.  Free program; no registration required.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

 

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings
Dec
3
12:00 pm12:00

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings

Lincoln Center partners with Otis Library to bring film screenings of world-class performances to your neighborhood.  Join us in the Community Room for a screening of Curtain Up: The School of American Ballet Workshop Performances.  No registration required; refreshments will be served.

Go behind the scenes for the first time ever to experience the intense training of ballet's brightest future stars as they prepare for their vital end-of-year performances.  An all-Balanchine program features Serenade, and excerpts from Swan Lake, and Western Symphony.

Community Room

 

Friday Film Series
Dec
2
1:00 pm13:00

Friday Film Series

Otis Library will screen four films in December that highlight the question "What Does It Mean To Be Human?"  This film series is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?, which will visit Otis Library in January 2017.  Guest lecturer Jason M. Sheldon will provide commentary before and after each film.

The first film to be shown is 2001: A Space Odyssey, the sci-fi masterpiece from acclaimed producer/director Stanley Kubrick (A Clockwork Orange, The Shining, Full Metal Jacket) about a space voyage to Jupiter that turns chaotic when a computer enhanced with artificial intelligence takes over. Visually breathtaking with Oscar-winning special effects, stunning cinematography, and an Academy Award-nominated script from Kubrick and best-selling  sci-fi author, Arthur C. Clarke.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

"Where We Call Home" Lecture Series
Nov
21
6:30 pm18:30

"Where We Call Home" Lecture Series

Otis Library hosts a four-part lecture series entitled “Where We Call Home” in the Millie and Martin Shapiro Community Room.  The series will discuss the changing definition of home and family in America.  It is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit, “Exploring Human Origins: What Does it Mean to be Human,” which will visit Otis Library in January 2017. 

On Monday, November 21, Attorney Peter Goselin will talk about his work with the “Scarborough 11,” a lawsuit currently taking place in Hartford over zoning regulations and the definition of family.  On Monday, December 5, Stephen Fan, editor of the book “Sub-Urbanisms: Casino Urbanization, Chinatowns, and the Contested American Landscape,” will discuss the changing face of Southeastern CT with the arrival of Foxwoods and Mohegan Sun casinos.  Each presentation will begin at 6:30 p.m., and will be followed by a question and answer session.  Free program; no registration required.

This program is funded by Connecticut Humanities. Connecticut Humanities, a nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities, supports cultural and historic organizations that tell the state’s stories, build community and enrich lives. 

 

O'tis a Festival: a marketplace of all things creative
Nov
19
10:00 am10:00

O'tis a Festival: a marketplace of all things creative

Otis Library kicks off the holiday shopping season with their eighth annual "O'tis a Festival: a marketplace of all things creative."  Join us for this joyful day of children's events, musical performances, a wreath and basket raffle, two full floors of handcrafted items, and a visit from Santa!  Over 40 crafters will be offering a variety of items, including jewelry, woodworking and pottery.  We hope to see you there!

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings
Nov
12
12:00 pm12:00

Lincoln Center Local: Free Screenings

Lincoln Center partners with libraries to bring exclusive free screenings of Lincoln Center's finest performances directly to your neighborhood.. Enjoy a free screening of Cassandra Wilson, The Campbell Brothers: A Sacred Steel Love Supreme, which was performed in August 2014.  

Cassandra Wilson: This daring, velvet-voiced performer has been breaking down barriers since her all-embracing Blue Light 'til Dawn, an album that redefined jazz singing thanks to Wilson's emotionally rich interpretations of blues, folk, and country songs, as well as standards and originals. This night, she will celebrate the landmark recording's 20th anniversary.

The Campbell Brothers: A Sacred Steel Love Supreme (World Premiere), Featuring visuals by Brock Monroe.  These torchbearers of sacred steel guitar reveal the full gospel affinities and spiritual transcendence of Coltrane's masterwork in a world premiere honoring its 50th anniversary. Monroe's improvised light show will weave ethereal, lace-like patterns in real-time dialogue with the musical mantra.

Upcoming free screenings at Otis Library:  December 3 - Curtain Up: The School of American Ballet Workshop Performances; Saturday, December 31 - New York Philharmonic New Year's Eve: La Vie Parisienne.

Food Fusion!
Nov
1
5:00 pm17:00

Food Fusion!

This program will take place at Norwich Technical High School, 7 Mahan Drive, Norwich.

A global look at food and culture, and how it has shaped the way we eat today.  Learn some easy tips to liven up your culinary repertoire and expand your senses through food! Demonstration and tasting provided by Chef Jason Bentley, CEC, Culinary Dept. Head and students at Norwich Tech.  This program is presented as a lead-in to the upcoming Smithsonian touring exhibit, "Exploring Human Origins: What Does It Mean To Be Human?" which will visit Otis Library in January 2017.  Registration is required; please call (860) 889-2365, ext. 128, or register on our online calendar.

Free Seminar on Long-Term Care Insurance
Oct
26
6:00 pm18:00

Free Seminar on Long-Term Care Insurance

You have your 401(k), your diversified portfolio, your retirement nest egg... You've thought of everything - except for how to protect these assets should you need long-term care. It's a fact: Just one year in a Connecticut nursing home can cost more than $148,000, and Medicare and health insurance may only cover a fraction of these costs.

Now there's a way to protect your life's savings . If you're 40 or older, long-term care insurance approved by the State's Connecticut Partnership for Long-Term Care should be part of your retirement plan.  These policies assure you of the highest quality standards.  They're affordable and provide asset protection, protect against inflation, and - most importantly - give you peace of mind through your retirement years.

Even if you've put aside money for your retirement, such as through a 401(k), these assets are vulnerable should you need long-term care.  Our free seminar will explain how long-term care insurance can help protect your retirement investments.

On Wednesday, October 26, at 6pm in the Community Room, Otis Library will be sponsoring a presentation on this very important topic with special guest speaker, Aldo Pantano, from the CT Partnership for Long-Term Care, with the State Office of Policy and Management.  Come learn about how the State's Partnership for Long-Term Care can help you plan ahead for your future long-term care needs.  Please call the library at 860-889-2365 ext. 125 to register.

No company specific products will be discussed, and there will be no sales or solicitations allowed - just information that you should know. 

Friends of Otis Library Book Sale
Oct
23
12:00 pm12:00

Friends of Otis Library Book Sale

The Friends of Otis Library Book Sale is here!

Mark you calendars!  The Friends of Otis Library Book Sale is October 21 - 23. This sale is bigger and better than ever, with something for everyone!

There will be an early bird preview on Friday, October 21, from 9am - 10am for a $10 fee.  

General admission hours are as follows: Friday, October 21, 10am - 3pm; Saturday, October 22, 10am - 3pm; and Sunday, October 23, 12pm - 3pm.